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End of Year Wrap-up, Ethics Style

I’ve covered a lot of different ground in the past year. Fall term was privacy of individuals; winter term was privacy under law; and spring term was privacy in software. That’s a bit of an simplification, though: I’ve also covered organizational tools through tech, American politics, ethical data collection and scrubbing, social media culture, preservation of digital projects, and more.

My goals, set out at the beginning of the year, were to improve my time management and organizational skills; to develop my ability to write project proposals; and to create a portfolio of the work I’ve done in the digital humanities. And I’ve done all of those things, in one way or another: I wrote a blog post annotating the tips and tricks I used for time management, wrote project proposals for several major projects including my social media zine and my portfolio, and — oh yeah — created my portfolio, available here.

I am so, so grateful to my supervisor Sarah, the other heads of the intern program Austin and Celeste, and the interns who worked with me in making this year a delight, Chris, Shiyue and Matt. This year, I learned about topics I’d barely even considered before, let alone thought of as relevant to digital ethics; I strengthened my research and writing skills, making me much more confident in my nonfiction and reporting abilities; and I created nearly twenty blog posts, all of which were (I hope) useful to someone.

What a ride. Thanks for taking part.

Here, by the way, is the semi-annotated bibliography of all the sources I looked at over the course of the year:

  • A bee with a blog. “Open Is Cancelled – A Bee with a Blog – Medium.” Medium (blog), January 13, 2020. https://medium.com/@beewithablog/open-is-cancelled-da7dd6f2aaaf An article published in response to the scandal involving Joi Ito, and Lawrence Lessig’s response, declaring the open-source software movement “cancelled”. The author brings criticisms specifically to open’s culture of prioritizing freedom over justice and privileging rationalist discourse. Part of some research I did into open-source software early in winter term.
  • “A Step-by-Step Guide to Self-Certification on the Privacy Shield Website.” Accessed February 19, 2020. https://www.privacyshield.gov/servlet/servlet.FileDownload?file=015t0000000QJzS.
  • Albright, Dann. “18 Time Management Systems To Boost Your Productivity.” Hubstaff Blog (blog), January 29, 2019. https://blog.hubstaff.com/time-management-tools/ A list of various time management systems and then short rundowns of how each one works. Used for my blog posts and research into organization and time management.
  • Beaumont, Peter, Julian Borger, and Daniel Boffey. “Malicious Forces Creating ‘perfect Storm’ of Coronavirus Disinformation.” The Guardian, April 24, 2020, sec. World news. https://www.theguardian.com/world/2020/apr/24/coronavirus-sparks-perfect-storm-of-state-led-disinformation Summarizes a rise in disinformation and misinformation campaigns in the first few weeks of people staying home due to the Coronavirus pandemic; heightened anxieties and political fervor create a situation where people who want news will click on frightening and untrue articles.
  • Bensinger, Greg. “So Far, under California’s New Privacy Law, Firms Are Disclosing Too Little Data — or Far Too Much.” Washington Post, January 21, 2020. https://www.washingtonpost.com/technology/2020/01/21/ccpa-transparency/ This article lays out the issues facing the California Consumer Privacy Act in its first month of existence, noting that it is unclear what constitutes a “sale” of personal data and companies can take advantage of this and other ambiguities to avoid having to change their practices. Part of my research into consumer data privacy laws for a blog post explaining the CCPA and any responsibilities Carleton might have under it.
  • Bishop, Katie. “We’re Embracing Tech during Lockdown – but Can It Replace the Classroom?” The Guardian, April 24, 2020, sec. Technology. https://www.theguardian.com/technology/2020/apr/24/remote-learning-classroom-technology-coronavirus Discussion of technological innovation and adaptation for teachers and educators as a result of online learning during the Coronavirus pandemic. I found this article interesting and relevant, so I brought it for one of our group discussions.
  • Board, Editorial. “Opinion | California’s Privacy Law Was Supposed to Spur Congress to Act. It Flubbed Instead.” Washington Post, January 7, 2020. https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/californias-privacy-law-was-supposed-to-spur-congress-to-act-it-flubbed-instead/2020/01/07/26088850-30c8-11ea-a053-dc6d944ba776_story.html An op-ed about the California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA) and the ways it was ineffective during its first month in practice. Part of my research for a blog post regarding consumer privacy law, the CCPA, and what Carleton’s responsibilities would look like regarding both.
  • Bours, Ben. “The Mirai Botnet Was Part of a College Student Minecraft Scheme | WIRED.” Wired, December 13, 2017. https://www.wired.com/story/mirai-botnet-minecraft-scam-brought-down-the-internet/ An article about the 2016 Mirai Botnet attack, a distributed denial of service (DDoS) attack which caused major internet outages across the East Coast in October 2016. The attack later turned out to be the result of people hosting pay-to-play Minecraft servers looking to slow down or disable their competitors’ servers, but turned out to be an incredibly powerful worm beyond what they had anticipated. Brought in by a fellow intern for one of our group article discussions.
  • Bowles, Nellie. “A Harvard Professor Doubles Down: If You Take Epstein’s Money, Do It in Secret – The New York Times.” The New York Times, September 14, 2019. https://www.nytimes.com/2019/09/14/business/lessig-epstein-ito-mit.html?auth=login-google1tap&login=google1tap An interview with Professor Lawrence Lessig, asking him to clarify views he put forth in an essay defending Joichi Ito for accepting money from Jeffrey Epstein. Lessig’s viewpoint is that accepting the money was wrong, but making the contribution anonymous once the money had been accepted was not, since Epstein could not use anonymous philanthropy to bolster his reputation. Ito was the director of the MIT Media Lab; this discussion relates to the presence of big money and corruption in tech.
  • Burger, Kevyn. “‘It’s OK Not to Be OK’: Minnesota Psychologists Push Back on ‘Toxic Positivity.’” Star Tribune, May 1, 2020. https://www.startribune.com/it-s-ok-not-to-be-ok-minnesota-psychologists-push-back-on-toxic-positivity/570042452/ An article explaining toxic positivity and its prevalence during the first few months of the Coronavirus pandemic. Toxic positivity is an insistent pressure to be positive and cheerful even in stressful and dismaying circumstances, leading people to shut down or ignore negative emotions rather than processing them in healthy ways. A resource found as part of a teleconference I attended discussing people’s reactions to the switch online, telecommuting, and social distancing.
  • Carleton.
  • “CCPA Fact Sheet (00000002).Pdf.” Accessed January 21, 2020. https://oag.ca.gov/system/files/attachments/press_releases/CCPA%20Fact%20Sheet%20%2800000002%29.pdf.
  • Corse, Emily Glazer, Deepa Seetharaman and Alexa. “The Shoestring App Developer Behind the Iowa Caucus Debacle.” Wall Street Journal, February 6, 2020, sec. Politics. https://www.wsj.com/articles/the-shoestring-app-developer-behind-the-iowa-caucus-debacle-11580904037 A short rundown of Shadow, Inc., the company which created an app for the 2020 Iowa Caucus which ended up causing major delays and security concerns throughout. Discusses their credentials, how they were hired, and pre-caucus concerns. Part of research I did for a blog post looking into the technological problems behind the 2020 Iowa Caucus.
  • Crispin, Jessa. “‘Incel’ Culture Has Sparked Panic and Pity – but Little Thoughtful Conversation | Jessa Crispin.” The Guardian, May 1, 2020, sec. Opinion. https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2020/may/01/incel-culture-film-tfw-no-gf-jessa-crispin A review of the documentary “TFW No GF”, created and funded by right-wing Internet reactionaries, and a meditation on how to understand them and why. Relevant to my work based on how Internet culture affects people differently, the sorts of subcultures that spring up, and the need to investigate and learn about alienated individuals and political countercultures, either to try and help or to more effectively combat their actions.
  • Dash, Anil.
    • “Function \\ F5: Why Are Copyrights on YouTube So Confusing?” Function with Anil Dash. Accessed February 6, 2020. https://glitch.com/culture/function-episode-5/ An explanation of copyright law with particular emphasis on digital works, and an interview with someone who got a copyright violation for posting his own work. Interesting breakdown of how copyright law works. ———.
    • “Function \\ F11: Social Media, 20 Years Ago.” Function with Anil Dash. Accessed February 3, 2020. https://glitch.com/culture/function-episode-11/ A roundtable with people who developed/contributed to early blogging platforms before contemporary social media existed, and a reflection on how their work shaped modern social media. ———.
    • “Function \\ F14: Design Bias Is Ruining Accessibility.” Function with Anil Dash. Accessed February 6, 2020. https://glitch.com/culture/function-episode-14/ Interviews surrounding the conversations that need to be happening around disability in tech, and disabled people of color.
  • Devlin, Hannah. “’We Are Hurtling towards a Surveillance State’: The Rise of Facial Recognition Technology.” The Guardian, October 5, 2019, sec. Technology. https://www.theguardian.com/technology/2019/oct/05/facial-recognition-technology-hurtling-towards-surveillance-state Article for Fall DSI discussion, talking about the development and use of facial recognition technology in different places around the world; crime deterrent, fighting child trafficking, etc.
  • Du, Susan. “Hennepin County Tells Library Workers to Staff Homeless Hotels or Take PTO.” City Pages, April 10, 2020. http://www.citypages.com/news/hennepin-county-tells-library-workers-to-staff-homeless-hotels-or-take-pto/569514121 An article discussing Hennepin County’s response to the Coronavirus pandemic crisis. The county converted several hotels into places where homeless people could stay, but without people to staff them, they called on county library workers to do that job, without training or information on what the job would require, for no additional pay; if workers refused, they had the option to take PTO, to take additional paid leave up to 240 hours (entering debt to the county) or to take unpaid leave. No word was given on whether library workers would be laid off after that, or whether they would be eligible for unemployment. A resource from a teleconference I attended discussing how people were reacting to the social distancing and self-isolation protocols, with particular focus on Minnesota, libraries, and overworking vs. protecting oneself.
  • “Editorial | The Guardian View on Machine Learning: A Computer Cleverer than You?” The Guardian, September 22, 2019, sec. Opinion. https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2019/sep/22/the-guardian-view-on-machine-learning-a-computer-cleverer-than-you This article talks about the concerns of the writer on developing AI and machine learning technology, particularly when people’s beliefs on the use of various technologies differs depending on the situation (eg, we should not develop X technology for warfare, unless our enemies are doing so already).
  • Elsevier. “The Researcher Journey through a Gender Lens | Elsevier.” Elsevier, March 5, 2020. https://www.elsevier.com/research-intelligence/resource-library/gender-report-2020 A report published by Elsevier looking into gender dynamics and equity in the research industry in the EU and 15 other countries. A resource I was connected to as part of a teleconference I attended (sponsored by Elsevier) which discussed library workers, social inequity, work/life balance and compensation, and life during and after the Coronavirus pandemic.
  • Ettarh, Fobazi M. “WTF Is a Radical Librarian, Anyway?” WTF is a Radical Librarian, Anyway? Accessed May 1, 2020. https://fobaziettarh.wordpress.com/ The blog of Fobazi Ettarh, where she discusses activism and librarianship, especially in each other’s context. I attended a webinar taught by her and this was offered as a source of extra literature.
  • “Executive Summary: Information Literacy in the Age of Algorithms.” Accessed February 12, 2020. https://www.projectinfolit.org/uploads/2/7/5/4/27541717/executivesummary.pdf.
  • Feingold, Laney. “Ethics in the Digital Accessibility Legal Space: ADA Enforcement Cases or Something Else?” Law Office of Lainey Feingold (blog), July 23, 2019. https://www.lflegal.com/2019/07/ethics-2/ A discussion of the influx of lawyers to disability rights cases regarding digital accessibility, operating in ways which set bad precedent so they can make a profit.
  • Feldman, Brian. “Is It Safe to Use Zoom?” Intelligencer, April 9, 2020. https://nymag.com/intelligencer/2020/04/the-zoom-app-has-a-lot-of-security-problems.html A roundup of the various security problems found in Zoom, the teleconferencing software adopted widely during the beginning of the Coronavirus pandemic. Part of my research for a blog post detailing these security problems and their relevance to Carleton’s usage of Zoom for synchronous online teaching.
  • Fruhlinger, Josh. “What Is Stuxnet, Who Created It and How Does It Work? | CSO Online.” CSO Online, August 22, 2017. https://www.csoonline.com/article/3218104/what-is-stuxnet-who-created-it-and-how-does-it-work.html Explains Stuxnet, a computer virus designed to propagate among computers, check whether a computer is used to operate a specific type of industrial machinery (specifically, uranium centrifuges), then sabotage uranium production equipment while hiding the presence of the virus until it’s too late. This article was brought in by a fellow intern for one of our group discussions.
  • Gillis, Roger. “LibGuides: Digital Humanities: What Is Digital Humanities?” Dalhousie University: Dalhousie Libraries. Accessed January 13, 2020. //dal.ca.libguides.com/digitalhumanities/home.
  • Greenberg, Andy. “Inside Pwn2Own’s High-Stakes Industrial Hacking Contest | WIRED.” Wired, January 23, 2020. https://www.wired.com/story/pwn2own-industrial-hacking-contest/ Pwn2Own is an annual hacking convention; this year’s focused on industrial control software and revealed major security issues in programs that control hardware around the country.
  • Harris, Tristan. “How Technology Is Hijacking Your Mind — from a Magician and Google Design Ethicist.” Medium (blog), July 6, 2017. https://medium.com/thrive-global/how-technology-hijacks-peoples-minds-from-a-magician-and-google-s-design-ethicist-56d62ef5edf3 This article is a brief list of different ways websites and other technologies, especially smartphones, use people’s instincts, habits and desires to keep them engaging in the way that suits the company’s needs.
  • Hern, Alex.
    • “Microsoft Boss: Tech Firms Must Stop ‘if It’s Legal, It’s Acceptable’ Approach.” The Guardian, September 20, 2019, sec. Technology. https://www.theguardian.com/technology/2019/sep/20/microsoft-boss-tech-firms-must-stop-if-its-legal-its-acceptable-approach This article details a statement from the president of Microsoft (Brad Smith) on responsible technology use. He believes that tech companies should practice responsible business strategies that involve not doing business with harmful companies just because it is legal to do so. However, he is against moratoriums on the development of certain technologies (such as facial recognition software) because he believes it is hard to learn the potential merits of a technology if it is outright banned; he also differentiates between not providing specific technology to specific people for specific purposes, and denying those people any Microsoft product (for example, not providing ICE with facial recognition technology, but not denying them Microsoft computers or word processing programs). ———.
    • “PayPal Pulls out of Facebook’s Libra Cryptocurrency.” The Guardian, October 7, 2019, sec. Technology. https://www.theguardian.com/technology/2019/oct/07/paypal-pulls-out-facebook-libra-cryptocurrency PayPal dropped out of the 28 (27) companies backing Facebook’s Libra cryptocurrency, did not give specifics but politely stated the project wasn’t for them but they still have a good relationship with Facebook. Libra has been coming under fire for a lot of regulatory bodies, like the French govt, which has pledged to block it in the EU, and several other governments which are worried about money laundering and what standard the currency will be pinned to.
  • Hodak, Brittany. “Why Tech Startups Love to Use the IO Domain Name Extension.” Hover (blog), June 17, 2019. https://www.hover.com/blog/tech-startups-use-io-domain-name/ A short explanation of the .io domain extension for websites and why it’s popular for companies in the tech industry.
  • Hodge, Rae.
    • “Using Zoom While Working from Home? Here Are the Privacy Risks to Watch out For.” CNET, April 2, 2020. https://www.cnet.com/news/using-zoom-while-working-from-home-here-are-the-privacy-risks-to-watch-out-for/ A quick explanation of various security issues, privacy problems, and overall drawbacks to using Zoom to telecommute during the Coronavirus pandemic. Part of my research for a blog post talking about Zoom’s privacy issues and how they impact Carleton’s usage of Zoom in the switch to online learning. ———.
    • “Zoom Security Issues: Zoom Could Be Vulnerable to Foreign Surveillance, Intel Report Says.” CNET, May 8, 2020. https://www.cnet.com/news/zoom-security-issues-zoom-could-be-vulnerable-to-foreign-surveillance-intel-report-says/ An updating list of Zoom’s discovered privacy issues, public and legal reactions, and Zoom’s statements and actions to combat these flaws. Part of my research into Zoom’s privacy issues and their impact on Carleton’s usage of Zoom for online teaching during the coronavirus pandemic (at the time of original access, the page had been updated through 4/28/2020; at this time it has been updated through 5/8/2020).
  • How to Bullet Journal. Bullet Journal, 2015. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fm15cmYU0IM A tutorial by the inventor of bullet journaling on what the basic ideas behind the system are. Much more low-frills than most bullet journaling tutorials, more focused on how to organize information and schedule events. Used as part of my research on time management and organization.
  • Hussain, Suhauna. “Is Zoom Safe to Use? Here’s What You Need to Know.” Los Angeles Times, April 13, 2020. https://www.latimes.com/business/technology/story/2020-04-13/is-zoom-safe-to-use-heres-what-you-need-to-know Answers to FAQ about Zoom’s security practices in the wake of its widespread adoption during the Coronavirus pandemic. The author’s general takeaway is that unless you are specifically dealing in very sensitive information, you can probably continue to use Zoom for personal and most work reasons. Part of my research for a blog post on Zoom’s privacy issues and their impact on Carleton’s switch to online learning over Zoom.
  • College of Saint Benedict & Saint John’s University. “Instructional Design.” Accessed May 1, 2020. https://www.csbsju.edu/instructional-technology/instructional-design.
  • Kehe, Jason. “Going Dumb: My Year With a Flip Phone.” Wired, December 29, 2018. https://www.wired.com/story/my-year-with-a-flip-phone/ Kehe talks about his time using a flip phone instead of a smart phone, and the social ramifications that came with it. He also discusses whether or not smart phones are really as bad as people say, and whether flip phones are really somehow “better”.
  • Kitty. “Eight (Free) Time Management Systems to Try in 2020 • Bitches Get Riches.” Bitches Get Riches (blog), January 27, 2020. http://www.bitchesgetriches.com/time-management-systems/ A summary of various time management systems, their pros and cons, digital and analog variants and advice on who each one might work for. I was doing a lot of research into time management and organization this week, so this was one of the sources that helped me clarify my methods.
  • Kolberg, Judith. “How to Get Organized with Adult ADHD: Organization with ADD.” Additude (blog), January 23, 2019. https://www.additudemag.com/how-to-get-organized-with-adhd/ A series of tips on organization and time management, geared towards people with ADHD but potentially useful for other people. Covers a variety of different situations. Used for my research on personal organization and time management.
  • Lessig, Lawrence. “On Joi and MIT – Lessig – Medium.” Medium (blog), September 8, 2019. https://medium.com/@lessig/on-joi-and-mit-3cb422fe5ae7 Lawrence Lessig’s explanation of his support for Joi Ito after Ito accepted money anonymously given by Jeffrey Epstein, in order to fund MIT’s Media Lab. His general expression is that, if you do choose to take money from a pedophile, abuser or other offender – someone whose money does not come from their bad behavior, but whose behavior cannot be discounted – taking it anonymously is a much better choice than taking it as a named donation; he states that, despite the fact that people’s reaction to Ito’s acceptance of Epstein’s money was horrified in part because of the secrecy and anonymity around it, he believes that publicizing Epstein’s charitable donations would be more wrong, as it would serve as “laundering reputation”. Part of a brief inquest into open-source software and corruption into major players in technological development.
  • Levin, Sam. “Netflix Co-Founder: ‘Blockbuster Laughed at Us … Now There’s One Left.’” The Guardian, September 14, 2019, sec. Media. https://www.theguardian.com/media/2019/sep/14/netflix-marc-randolph-founder-blockbuster A summary of the history of Netflix and its near-acquisition by Amazon, its rivalry with Blockbuster, and its eventual victory and place as a staple of the modern streaming era. Interesting to me as an insight into the business operations of the entertainment technology industry.
  • Lewis, Peter. “It’s Time for Tighter Regulation of How Facebook and Google Use Our Data | Peter Lewis.” The Guardian, August 7, 2019, sec. Technology. https://www.theguardian.com/technology/commentisfree/2019/aug/07/its-time-for-tighter-regulation-of-how-facebook-and-google-use-our-data A call for regulation of companies which trade in big data, like Facebook or Google, and a warning against political rhetoric which would claim that big data has useful implications for public safety. Lewis calls back to 9/11 and how developing tech companies were encouraged to gather as much data as possible in the name of national security. Important to my work both on consumer data privacy and the use of big data in American politics.
  • @Literature_Geek. “Dr. Amanda Visconti on Twitter: ‘.@jeremykboggs+I Blogged an Abstract We Submitted for a Collection—It Wasn’t Accepted, but We’re Going to Do the Work It Discusses Anyway, and Seek Publication Elsewhere Https://T.Co/Jt4le6XoWr’ / Twitter.” Twitter (blog), January 23, 2020. https://twitter.com/Literature_Geek/status/1220356495411306498 A twitter thread musing on the necessity of feminist & queer approaches to software licensing, especially after Richard Stallman’s resignation as the president and chairman of the Free Software Foundation. Links to an academic paper on the same topic, quote tweets a thread re: Stallman.
  • Markham, Annette. “OKCupid Data Release Fiasco: It’s Time to Rethink Ethics Education | Annette Markham.” Annette Markham (blog), May 19, 2016. https://annettemarkham.com/2016/05/okcupid-data-release-fiasco-its-time-to-rethink-ethics-education/ Discussion of the usage of data released through leaks or without the consent of the users to whom it belongs (in the context of the OKCupid data release, where information regarding 70,000 users was released onto Open Science Framework and then removed following OKCupid’s DMCA takedown notice). One researcher who used the data declined to anonymize it, stating that because the data had been released to the public, he did not have an ethical responsibility to do so. Relevant to my fall term work regarding data collection, aggregation and anonymization, and the ability to identify subjects using specific aspects of collected data even in sets that did not collect specific identifiers.
  • Martineau, Paris. “YouTube Will Police Political Videos More Closely.” Wired, February 3, 2020. https://www.wired.com/story/youtube-police-political-videos-more-closely/ An article writing up Youtube’s statement that they will no longer host manipulated videos, conspiracy theories, or micro-targeted political ads (put out around the time of the 2020 Iowa Caucus, the beginning of presidential election season). Important to my research about the role of technology in American politics.
  • Martines, Jamie. “Forget Big Data—Little Data Lets Students Learn at Their Own Pace.” Wired, November 4, 2016. https://www.wired.com/2016/11/forget-big-data-little-data-making-learning-personal/ Discusses the use of “little data”, or individualized data, to help personalize students’ learning experiences in the classroom. Little data doesn’t have to be technologically driven, though there are definitely high tech classrooms. The idea is that collecting individualized data makes it easier for teachers to understand their students’ needs.
  • McCarthy, Kieren. “Unbreakable Smart Lock Devastated to Discover Screwdrivers Exist • The Register.” The Register, June 15, 2018. https://www.theregister.co.uk/2018/06/15/taplock_broken_screwdriver/ A quick writeup of Tapplock, a supposedly unbreakable smartlock (unlockable by fingerprint) which can be dismantled using common household tools. Found for fun in one of our weekly discussion meetings.
  • McDaniel, Caleb. “Data Mining the Internet Archive Collection.” Programming Historian, March 3, 2014. https://programminghistorian.org/en/lessons/data-mining-the-internet-archive A tutorial on ways to data mine information from the Internet Archive. Discusses how to use Python to download and parse MARC records.
  • Morrison, Sara. “California’s New Privacy Law, Explained.” Vox, December 30, 2019. https://www.vox.com/recode/2019/12/30/21030754/ccpa-2020-california-privacy-law-rights-explained A quick writeup of CCPA, what the law says, what that means practically speaking, and where the law applies & falls short.
  • Munroe, Randall. XKCD: Voting Software. August 8, 2018. Webcomic. https://xkcd.com/2030/ A short comic depicting computer scientists reacting to the idea of using software for elections. Resource used for my blog post on the 2020 Iowa Caucus and the issues resulting from using an app to report results.
  • Murdock, Jason. “Is Zoom Safe and Is Your Privacy at Risk? Video Calling App Explained after Hacking Vulnerabilities Exposed.” Newsweek, April 2, 2020. https://www.newsweek.com/zoom-safe-privacy-risks-explained-video-calling-app-hacking-vulnerabilities-coronavirus-1495728 A write up of public and political reactions to Zoom’s privacy and security concerns. Used as a source for a blog post regarding Zoom’s privacy issues and their impact on Carleton’s use of Zoom for online learning.
  • Narea, Nicole. “Trump Has Expanded the Travel Ban to 6 More Countries.” Vox, January 31, 2020. https://www.vox.com/2020/1/31/21116736/trump-travel-ban-nigeria-immigrant An explanation of how the January travel ban works, which immigration visas it affects, and which countries were specifically listed as being restricted or blocked outright. Used as a resource for a blog post summarizing the travel ban and its impact on Carleton students and faculty (both international community members and academic abroad programs). Also relevant to my fall work on the Public Memory of Myanmar project.
  • Nathans-Kelly, Traci. “Helping Students Learn Via Online Delivery.” April 14, 2020. https://on24static.akamaized.net/event/22/63/27/6/rt/1/documents/resourceList1586809182391/ieeeap14webinarnathanskellyhelpingstudentslearnviaonlinedelivery1586809151587.pdf. Ng,
  • Kristen W. “President Trump Issues New Proclamation on Travel Ban, Adding Six Additional Countries.” The National Law Review, February 3, 2020. https://www.natlawreview.com/article/president-trump-issues-new-proclamation-travel-ban-adding-six-additional-countries A overview of Trump’s January 31st travel ban, explaining the legal ramifications of which immigrants would be restricted from which countries, which visas would be affected, and when it would take effect for foreign nationals. Used as a resource for a blog post on the travel ban and how it would affect Carleton’s community (international students and faculty as well as academic abroad programs).
  • Nield, David. “How to Keep Your Zoom Chats Private and Secure.” Wired, April 5, 2020. https://www.wired.com/story/keep-zoom-chats-private-secure/ Security advice regarding how to prevent privacy issues, Zoombombing, and uninvited users on Zoom. Used as a resource for a blog post on Zoom’s privacy issues and how they impact Carleton’s switch to online learning through Zoom.
  • O’Flaherty, Kate. “Zoom Security: Here’s What Zoom Is Doing To Make Its Service Safer.” Forbes, April 10, 2020. https://www.forbes.com/sites/kateoflahertyuk/2020/04/10/zoom-security-heres-what-zoom-is-doing-to-make-its-service-safer/ A summary of Zoom’s reaction to criticisms of their security and privacy problems, including hiring Facebook’s former Chief Security Officer as a consultant, freezing new features in order to focus on security, and introducing new privacy protocols to prevent people from joining a call without being approved or invited. Used as a source for a blog post on Zoom’s privacy issues and how they impact Carleton’s switch to online learning through Zoom.
  • O’Rourke, Ciara. “PolitiFact – Private Messages Sent to Zoom Meeting Hosts Could Appear in Their Transcript.” Politifact, April 13, 2020. https://www.politifact.com/factchecks/2020/apr/13/viral-image/private-messages-sent-zoom-meeting-hosts-could-app/ Fact checking for the rumor that Zoom meeting hosts would receive a record of all private chats made over the course of a meeting; this is untrue, as meeting hosts receive a transcript of the public chat as well as any messages sent to them. Used as a resource for a blog post on Zoom’s privacy issues and how they impact Carleton’s switch to online learning over Zoom.
  • Osborne, Hilary, and Poppy Noor. “How to Avoid Amazon: The Definitive Guide to Online Shopping – without the Retail Titan.” The Guardian, April 27, 2020, sec. Technology. https://www.theguardian.com/technology/2020/apr/27/how-to-avoid-amazon-the-definitive-guide-to-online-shopping-without-the-retail-titan Advice for how to avoid giving business to Amazon after a boom in online shopping due to self-isolation and social distancing in the pandemic. Relevant to how people practice ethics when society moves towards doing business online.
  • Paul, Kari.
    • “Uber, Lyft and Airbnb Cut Thousands of Jobs as Pandemic Batters Silicon Valley.” The Guardian, May 8, 2020, sec. Technology. https://www.theguardian.com/technology/2020/may/08/tech-layoffs-coronavirus-uber-airbnb Reading for DSI discussion, talking about the economic effects of the pandemic on gig-economy companies as well as tech companies (some travel-based gig companies are suffering, but food delivery companies have seen a spike in usage). ———.
    • “Worried about Zoom’s Privacy Problems? A Guide to Your Video-Conferencing Options.” The Guardian, April 9, 2020, sec. Technology. https://www.theguardian.com/technology/2020/apr/08/zoom-privacy-video-chat-alternatives A summary of the pros and cons of Zoom and its competitors in the context of Zoom’s security concerns. Used as a resource for a blog post on Zoom’s privacy issues and how they impact Carleton’s switch to online learning over Zoom.
  • Paunescu, Delia. “There’s a Scam Running in at Least Nine States on Airbnb. Here’s How It Works.” Vox, November 14, 2019. https://www.vox.com/2019/11/14/20961972/airbnb-scam-how-to-stay-safe-reset-podcast Summary of an Airbnb scam discovered by reporter Allie Conti and an interview with NYT tech reporter Mike Isaac about how rapid scaling for tech startups leaves major opportunities for exploitative scams, security issues, and other predatory practices.
  • Payne, Kate, and Miles Parks. “Despite Election Security Fears, Iowa Caucuses Will Use New Smartphone App.” NPR, January 14, 2020. https://www.npr.org/2020/01/14/795906732/despite-election-security-fears-iowa-caucuses-will-use-new-smartphone-app Short writeup of the plan to use voting app technology to communicate the results of the Iowa Caucus. Security concerns from cybersecurity experts, but the Iowa Democratic Caucus chose to use smartphone technology anyway.
  • Privacy Shield.
    • “Benefits of Participation | Privacy Shield.” Privacy Shield Framework. Accessed February 19, 2020. https://www.privacyshield.gov/article?id=Benefits-of-Participation The benefits of participating in the EU Privacy Shield regulation program. Seem to sum up to: EU will do business more easily with you, and it’s cost-effective. ———.
  • Rayome, Alison DeNisco. “10 Free Zoom Alternative Apps for Video Chats.” CNET, April 6, 2020. https://www.cnet.com/news/10-free-zoom-alternative-apps-for-video-chats/ A list of Zoom’s competitors and their pros and cons for use during work from home and the Coronavirus pandemic. Used as a resource for a blog post on Zoom’s privacy issues and their impact on Carleton’s switch to online learning over Zoom.
  • Reese, Hope. “Top 5 Video Conferencing Services to Use with Remote Employees.” TechRepublic, February 19, 2020. https://www.techrepublic.com/article/top-5-video-conferencing-services-to-use-with-remote-employees/ List of available software to host online meetings, published a month before everyone had to switch to telecommuting online. Used as a source for a blog post detailing Zoom’s privacy issues and their impact on Carleton’s move to teaching online.
  • Romm, Tony. “California Adopted the Country’s First Major Consumer Privacy Law. Now, Silicon Valley Is Trying to Rewrite It.” Washington Post, September 3, 2019. https://www.washingtonpost.com/technology/2019/09/02/california-adopted-countrys-first-major-consumer-privacy-law-now-silicon-valley-is-trying-rewrite-it/ Discussion of advertising campaigns sponsored by major social media outlets such as Twitter and Facebook, designed to combat the California Consumer Privacy Act. The CCPA would put certain controls on companies based in California regarding how they store and use their users’ data. The advertising campaigns were centered around making consumers believe that if the CCPA were passed, the internet would become more expensive/more censored.
  • Sabbagh, Dan. “UK Ministers Will No Longer Claim ‘no Successful Examples’ of Russian Interference.” The Guardian, March 15, 2020, sec. Technology. https://www.theguardian.com/technology/2020/mar/15/uk-ministers-will-no-longer-claim-no-successful-examples-of-russian-interference Details the change in tone from UK government officials after evidence was found of Russia hacking into an NHS dossier and a special adviser’s personal email account, as well as interfering in the Brexit referendum. No information given on followup action.
  • @shadowinchq. “We Sincerely Regret the Delay in the Reporting of the Results of Last Night’s Iowa Caucuses and the Uncertainty It Has Caused to the Candidates, Their Campaigns, and Democratic Caucus-Goers.” Twitter (blog), February 4, 2020. https://twitter.com/shadowinchq/status/1224773796307050497 A response by Shadow, Inc., the company which created the app that caused major technical difficulties and delays for the 2020 Iowa Caucus. Part of my research for a blog post about the problems surrounding the Iowa Caucus, relating to cybersecurity and other issues with democracy through digital technology.
  • Shane, Janelle. “How to Begin a Novel.” AI Weirdness (blog), November 19, 2019. https://aiweirdness.com/post/189170306297/how-to-begin-a-novel Just a fun demonstration of how neural networks can be used in different contexts. In this case, the neural network was used to generate the first line of a nonexistent novel (sometimes successfully, sometimes… less so).
  • Shubber, Kadhim. “First Ever Web Page Put Back Online by Cern | WIRED UK.” Wired, April 30, 2013. https://www.wired.co.uk/article/first-web-page Talking about the development of the World Wide Web and the first ever webpage, put back online by Cern.
  • Staats, Beth. “Algorithm Literacy 101: A Study by Project Information Literacy | Minitex News.” Minitex News, January 21, 2020. https://news.minitex.umn.edu/node/4514 A brief writeup of a study conducted by Project Information Literacy, assessing information literacy online in college students. Relevant to how people spot fake news and regard their data privacy rights.
  • @steak_umm. “Friendly Reminder in Times of Uncertainty and Misinformation: Anecdotes Are Not Data. (Good) Data Is Carefully Measured and Collected Information Based on a Range of Subject-Dependent Factors, Including, but Not Limited to, Controlled Variables, Meta-Analysis, and Randomization.” Twitter (blog), April 6, 2020. https://twitter.com/steak_umm/status/1247343900475490304 A Twitter thread published by Steak-umm calling on people to check their sources and avoid conflating anecdotes with data in order to combat misinformation during the coronavirus pandemic. Generally relevant to the topics of digital misinformation and ethics.
  • Sterling, Michelle. “The Antisocial Network: How the 90s Internet Died Like Diaryland.” Vice, November 6, 2014. https://www.vice.com/en_us/article/jp5vdg/the-antisocial-network-how-the-90s-internet-died-like-diaryland An interview with the creator of Diaryland, an early form of social media that lost popularity and failed to monetize user data. Discussion of the cultures that arose there, why people liked it so much, and the business difficulties the creator faced. Used for research into a project on the history of social media and online culture.
  • Stewart, Emily.
  • Strauss, Daniel. “Trump Administration Unveils Expanded Travel Ban.” The Guardian, January 31, 2020, sec. US news. https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2020/jan/31/travel-ban-trump-countries-announcement A short explanation of the political context of Trump’s January 31st travel ban, and the current and likely reactions of politicians. Used as a source for a blog post on the travel ban and its impact on Carleton’s international community and abroad programs.
  • Sustaining DH. “Sustaining DH – An NEH Institute for Advanced Topics in the Digital Humanities.” Accessed January 24, 2020. https://sites.haa.pitt.edu/sustainabilityinstitute/ DH needs to be sustained both technologically and socially in its preservation; this site is for an institute that conducts workshops on the Socio-Technological Sustainability Roadmap in order to further these goals.
  • Swisher, Kara. “Opinion | The Immunity of the Tech Giants.” The New York Times, May 1, 2020, sec. Opinion. https://www.nytimes.com/2020/05/01/opinion/tech-companies-coronavirus.html Swisher calls for criticism of big tech companies as the pandemic drives people more towards tech and online business, since the increasing size of those companies means they’ll be more able to do what they want and the fines levied against them are too small (against their comparative profit) to be an effective deterrent against bad action.
  • “The EU-US and Swiss-US Privacy Shield Frameworks.” Accessed February 19, 2020. https://www.privacyshield.gov/servlet/servlet.FileDownload?file=015t0000000QJdg. CERN. “The World Wide Web Project.” Accessed January 27, 2020. http://info.cern.ch/hypertext/WWW/TheProject.html The first website, or at least the earliest copy of it that we have!
  • Tims, Anna. “Fraudsters Hijack EBay Parcels in a Postcode Lottery.” The Observer, September 22, 2019, sec. Money. https://www.theguardian.com/money/2019/sep/22/fraudsters-hijack-ebay-parcels-postcode-scam Tracking software used by the Royal Mail only tracks whether packages are delivered to the right postcode, not the right address, which means that people used this information to commit fraud on Ebay by “returning” packages they claimed were defective.
  • Wageinseil, Paul. “Zoom Privacy and Security Issues: Here’s Everything That’s Wrong (so Far).” Tom’s Guide, June 1, 2020. https://www.tomsguide.com/news/zoom-security-privacy-woes An updating summary of the privacy issues, security problems and tech troubles affecting Zoom (originally accessed 5/6/2020; the article’s most recent update was 6/1/2020). Used as a resource for a blog post detailing Zoom’s privacy issues and their impact on Carleton’s move to online learning.
  • Usenet. “What Is Usenet? Question About Usenet – Usenet.Com.” Accessed February 3, 2020. https://www.usenet.com/what-is-usenet/. “What We Know About The App That Delayed Iowa’s Caucus Results.” NPR.Org, February 4, 2020. https://www.npr.org/2020/02/04/802583844/what-we-know-about-the-app-that-delayed-iowas-caucus-results A piece explaining cybersecurity concerns surrounding the app used in the 2020 Iowa Caucus to report results, the leadup to the Caucus, tension between the Iowa Democratic Party and the DNC, and the credentials and response of Shadow, Inc., the company which made the app. Used as a source for a blog post on the 2020 Iowa Caucus.
  • Whittaker, Zack. “Iowa’s Caucus App Was a Disaster Waiting to Happen.” TechCrunch (blog), February 4, 2020. http://social.techcrunch.com/2020/02/04/iowa-caucus-app-disaster/ A rundown of the Iowa Caucus smartphone app debacle from the perspective of experts in the cybersecurity industry. Used as a resource for a blog post about the 2020 Iowa Caucus.
  • Wong, Julia Carrie. “Amazon Is Using Coronavirus to Expand Its Power – and Not for the Greater Good | Julia Carrie Wong.” The Guardian, March 24, 2020, sec. Technology. https://www.theguardian.com/technology/commentisfree/2020/mar/24/the-us-of-amazon-how-the-coronavirus-has-created-a-governance-vacuum-the-tech-giant-is-quickly-filling Criticism of Amazon’s newfound grasp on the economy as more people move to shopping online as a result of self-isolation in the Coronavirus pandemic. Wong specifically mentions the superficial similarities between Amazon’s hiring 100,000 workers and giving a $2-per-hour pay raise and the WPA, but notes that as a publicly traded company, Amazon’s duty is not to their employees or to their customers, but to their stockholders.
  • Wong, Julia Carrie, and Mario Koran. “Google Contract Workers in Pittsburgh Vote to Form Union.” The Guardian, September 24, 2019, sec. Technology. https://www.theguardian.com/technology/2019/sep/24/google-contract-workers-in-pittsburgh-vote-to-form-union Employees at HCL America, a company used by Google to outsource some work, have voted to unionize with the United Steel Workers (USW) under the union name Pittsburgh Association of Tech Professionals (PATP).
  • YouTube. “How YouTube Supports Elections.” Official YouTube Blog (blog), February 3, 2020. https://youtube.googleblog.com/2020/02/how-youtube-supports-elections.html Youtube’s public statement of commitment to fighting election-related misinformation campaigns, screening and featuring actual political leaders, and shut down deceptive or doctored content on their site. Related to the use of technology in American politics.
  • Zoom. “Video Conferencing, Web Conferencing, Webinars, Screen Sharing.” Zoom Video. Accessed May 6, 2020. https://zoom.us/ Zoom’s home site. Used as a source for a blog post detailing Zoom’s privacy issues and their impact on Carleton’s move to online learning.
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